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Backyard Agriculture

For many families in the uplands, the cramped spaces around their homes is all the land they've got.

Approximately 1/3 of the hilltribe residents of UHDP's focus area of 21 communities lack access to any farmland. Consequently, they are dependent on hiring out as seasonal farm labor on local plantations. Unfortunately such work and income is often infrequent. As a result, UHDP is working to help "landless farmers" supplement family food and income through backyard agriculture. However, challenges to backyard farming include very limited land, poor soil, shade and lack of water. So what might be done?

 

Viable backyard agriculture approaches include small-scale livestock production (mainly pigs and native chickens), catfish production in tanks, mushroom farming and gardening. Backyard gardening should include mixtures of both annual vegetables (e.g., beans, pumpkins, eggplants) and even more importantly, deep--rooted perennial vegetables and fruits that do not require much watering and bear throuqhout much of the year.

backyard-pig-production-002

Backyard pig production can be quite profitable with strong local demand for pork.

Although most productive during the warmer months, backyard catfish production offers both food and income potential for small spaces.

backyard frog production offers both food and income potential for small spaces.

Mixtures of annual vegetables and deep-rooted, perennial fruit and vegetable varieties increase family food sufficiency.

backyard catfish production offers both food and income potential for small spaces.

Mixtures of annual vegetables and deep-rooted, perennial fruit and vegetable varieties increase family food sufficiency.

backyard pig production offers both food and income potential for small spaces.